Stacking the Shelves
Stacking the Shelves / June 8, 2019

Stacking the Shelves is a weekly feature all about sharing your good luck in book acquisitions! So here’s what came my way since my last post! This is another amazing haul, I am so excited about some of these books! Received for Review This book just sounds like an incredibly fun western/urban fantasy, can’t wait to read it. Many thanks to DAW books! OK, I was sooo excited when this one showed up. I loved the Blackthorn and Grim series and have been eager to read more Marillier. This new series, with a warrior-bard protagonist? I am so anxious to read it! So many thanks to Ace Books! . This one might be a tad out of my wheel house, so I may wait to hear some reviews first. But if I get the urge to read something different, maybe I’ll give it a try. My thanks to Harper Voyager for the early copy! This is another book I was excited to have show up. The synopsis sounds beautiful and magical, so I’m excited to find out if it lives up to my expectations. So many thanks to Redhook for sending this my way! Tor Books was good to me this…

Throwback Thursday – The Just City by Jo Walton
Throwback Thursday / April 4, 2019

Throwback Thursday is a weekly feature to highlight books from the past. It can honestly be anything as long as its not a book that is a current release. Maybe its a book that I read and reviewed and just want to highlight, maybe its a book I read before I started reviewing or maybe its a book that has a sequel coming out soon or maybe its a backlist book from my TBR that I just want to revisit and decide if I will make the time to read. Pretty much, anything goes.  If you have a backlist book you want to feature in someway, please feel free to join in! This week’s choice is The Just City by Jo Walton A very thought provoking and insightful book that makes you question the way things are in the world, as well as how they could be (and if that “other way” would really be better or worse). The Just City is an experiment carried out with by a Goddess whose goal was to create perfectly balanced society where its citizens are judged solely on their own merits and abilities. There is to be no preferential treatment, people there should want to be their best selves and strive to do right by the city. If everyone lives by this code, then the city should thrive. Right? Heh … You’ll have to…

Stacking the Shelves – March 2, 2019
Stacking the Shelves / March 2, 2019

Stacking the Shelves is a weekly feature all about sharing your good luck in book acquisitions! So here’s what came my way since my last post! Received for Review It’s been another couple of great weeks for book additions! These were all surprise arrivals and 3 of them are ones I I absolutely loved Torn, it was just a delight to read and I am so looking forward to Fray! Many thanks to Orbit Books! I am not always huge on re-tellings, but this one sounds really intriguing and a good mix of darkness mixed in. My thanks to Berkley for the advanced copy! Creation Machine is new to me, but it does sound like a fun read. Lent is one I have been eyeing as I love the other books I’ve read by Jo Walton. So many thanks to Tor Books for sending these my way! This is one I’ve been looking forward to. Maybe because I enjoyed the sewing magic in Torn (and looking forward to Fray), but regardless, it sounds like great fun! Thanks to Random House Children’s Knopf Books for Young Readers

Top Ten Tuesday – Places Mentioned In Books I’d Like to Visit
Top Ten Tuesday / February 26, 2019

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme by That Artsy Reader Girl.This feature gives a weekly Top Ten list. We all love lists, right?    This week’s theme is  Places Mentioned In Books That I’d Like to Visit (submitted by Georgia @justreadthemm) The Eolian My first pick is the The Eolian. A place where the top musicians come to try and earn their pipes (the highest honor, that will pretty much ensure they can work as a musician anywhere). There are so many reason why I love The Kingkiller Chronicles, and the magic of The Eolian is definitely one of them.   Glamourist Histories I honestly can not remember what the setting for this one was exactly, but it’s pretty much Regency with magic and glamours. It just sounds beautiful, so I wanna go. Camorr A city of canals, bridges, and elderglass (which can glimmer in the dark), towers of different colors, it just sounds beautiful. The Great Library I mean, the name says it all. Even if the people running this library are a bit evil, I still want to go. Just have to make sure not to piss off the killer automatons guarding it.    The Just City A place where the greatest…

Top Ten Tuesday – Back to School
Top Ten Tuesday / August 28, 2018

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme by That Artsy Reader Girl.This feature gives a weekly Top Ten list. We all love lists, right? This week’s theme is Back to School –  Books that take place at school/boarding school (at least in some part)

Review: Necessity by Jo Walton
3.5 Stars , Reviews / August 16, 2016

Necessity is the final book in the Thessaly trilogy by Jo Walton. As the story continues generations from the start of the series, we find the citizens doing very well, integrating themselves into the interstellar world. There are alien residents and traders visiting the planet. The individual cities seem to be thriving, and people are free to move wherever they feel best fits their personal ideology. It is utopia, finally (or at least much closer than they had achieved previously). But there are complications caused by a sudden death and then a nearing spaceship that will be their first interactions with space humans which kick our story for this final chapter in the series. I have to say, my reading experience with this one was a little different than the first two. Both The Just City and Philosopher Kings seemed to create a more philosophical undertone to them that I just didn’t find in Necessity. The Just City really showed how rigid structure, even when it is with the best intentions, creates a new set of problems. It also explored what constitutes a thinking being, at what point does artificial intelligence become independent and an individual. Philosopher Kings took a strong look at forgiveness versus vengeance,…

Review: The Philosopher Kings by Jo Walton
4.5 Stars , Reviews / June 28, 2015

The Just City blew me away when I read it earlier this year (here’s my review incase you missed it), so I felt like the The Philosopher Kings, which was firmly on my must read list,  had much to live up to. The Pilosopher Kings starts in a dramatic way. Since the last book, 20 years have passed and the people have divided and formed multiple cities, each pursuing its own version or idea of excellence. Some with stricter interpretations of Plato, some with more lenient. But, the division leaves the new cities without the art they are so used to. Humans being humans, they find something to fight about, in this case, possession of art. The Remnant City (the original Just City) suffers attacks from “art raids” as some of the new cities try to take art they feel entitled to. One of these art raids at the beginning of the book ends in tragedy, triggering the rest of the story. This is a very philosophical book (as one might expect). The book examines forgiveness versus vengeance, slavery, posterity, grief. It is a story that really highlights how you react is just as important as events that have happened. We see…

The Just City by Jo Walton
5 Stars , Reviews / January 10, 2015

A very thought provoking and insightful book that makes you question the way things are in the world, as well as how they could be (and if that “other way” would really be better or worse). The Just City is an experiment carried out with by a Goddess. Her goal was to create perfectly balanced society where its citizens are judged solely on their own merits and abilities. There is to be no preferential treatment, people there should want to be their best selves and strive to do right by the city. If everyone lives by this code, then the city should thrive. The adults (or “masters”) in the city were all prayed to Pallas Athene for exactly this opportunity. They expressed a desire and interest to come to this. Many of them are people famous for their ideas and efforts during their times in history. The children however, were brought to the city under different circumstances. The city needed children for the experiment to work, but there was controversy over how to best do this. How can you best populate a new city with over ten thousand 10 year olds? It makes for an interesting dynamic. Since the masters had all prayed to Athena specifically to…