Throwback Thursday – The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch
Throwback Thursday / May 9, 2019

Throwback Thursday is a weekly feature to highlight books from the past. It can honestly be anything as long as its not a book that is a current release. Maybe its a book that I read and reviewed and just want to highlight, maybe its a book I read before I started reviewing or maybe its a book that has a sequel coming out soon or maybe its a backlist book from my TBR that I just want to revisit and decide if I will make the time to read. Pretty much, anything goes.  If you have a backlist book you want to feature in someway, please feel free to join in! (I’ll include a link-up for anyone who wants to participate) This week’s choice is Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch. Yes, I know this is a very popular and often recommended book, but it is one that I read before I started reviewing so I figured it was time to feature it. Yes, this is a popular book, you see it recommended all over the place. But the thing is? It deserves it. This book quickly pulled me in, Locke is such an enjoyable and relatable protagonist. An orphan who, unlike many protagonists in fantasy, doesn’t have any magical ability or fighting skills. His strength is his personality and his skill at deception and pulling cons. We meet Locke when he is young and alone in the streets….

Tough Traveling – Witches

Nathan over at Fantasy Review Barn is the mastermind of Tough Traveling. What’s Tough Traveling? Pretty much, it’s a weekly feature on Thursdays where we dig around to come up with examples of common tropes in fantasy, using Diana Wynne Jones’ The Tough Guide to Fantasyland as our inspiration and guide. Nathan has invited one and all to join in the fun, so feel free to come up with your own lists and add the link on Nathan’s weekly post, which will also contain (unleash) the next weeks theme. So let the fun begin … This weeks theme? WITCHES Witches are special and probably at least the equal of WIZARDS. Right, so I don’t know how many of these qualify as witches really. Just because they are a magic user and female, does that make them a witch? Seems kinda stereotypical and sexist, but looking at my list, I am definitely guilty. (Although, I KNOW I have read a book with male witches, or at least one male witch. Just for the life of me can’t remember what it was.) Or if others label them as a witch, even if that’s not how they see themselves does that count? Some of my choices are likely tenuous,…

Tough Traveling – Pirates

Nathan over at Fantasy Review Barn is the mastermind of Tough Traveling. What’s Tough Traveling? Pretty much, it’s a weekly feature on Thursdays where we dig around to come up with examples of common tropes in fantasy, using Diana Wynne Jones’ The Tough Guide to Fantasyland as our inspiration and guide. Nathan has invited one and all to join in the fun, so feel free to come up with your own lists and add the link on Nathan’s weekly post, which will also contain (unleash) the next weeks theme. So let the fun begin … This weeks theme? PIRATES!  PIRATES range the seas in force, though most of them operate individually. The sole qualifications are that they must be rough and ruthless, with a penchant for dressing gaudily. This usually includes pierced ears. Pirates are always beaten off after a bloody sword fight, unless you have not yet been enslaved.. Pirates!! I actually have a good number of books on my TBR pile that I know for sure easily qualify for this. But, looking through books I have read and finding some is actually a bit more of a challenge.   Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding – Hey, just because they have an airship doesn’t mean…

The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch
5 Stars , Reviews / September 23, 2013

  The Republic of Thieves is one of those books that make me second guess all the other 5 star ratings I have doled out this year. In some ways it felt very familiar (in a good way) to go back to reading a story by Lynch. Once again, I love his prose. I love the irreverent nature of the Bastards. In addition to the scheming and thievery, each book so far has shown Locke grow in his relationships with people around him. Lies of Locke Lamora showed Locke grow from independent orphan out for his own survival, to learning to become part of (and lead) a tight knit group of thieves. He evolved and learned to think beyond himself and towards the good of his comrades as well, he learned to appreciate strengths possessed by others and that working together is mutually beneficial. He learned his actions on his own could also have severe results on his allies if he doesn’t take the time to look at the larger picture. In Red Seas under Red Skies, Locke adjusted from being part of a group to becoming part of a pair, a team of two. We saw evolutions in Locke…